Tag Archives: desserts

Yummy Strawberries

I made these strawberries for dessert after a big dinner party and they were a serious hit! They became an even bigger hit when my guests found out that I got the recipe from my 16 year-old niece who had just done a job-shadowing day with none other than Bonnie Stern!

Sari said, “They’re really good.”  That means….they’re really good. Sari says to use more chocolate than you need, so that way “you can lick the bowl…dip your fingers in it.”

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Ingredients

  • Baker’s White Chocolate 6 squares
  • 2 pints of strawberries – rinsed and dried
  • skinless, unsalted, roasted pistachios

Directions

  1. Make sure strawberries are “like really dry.”
  2. Melt chocolate in a double-boiler. Sari says, “be careful because you can burn the chocolate. watch it”
  3. Pulse the pistachios in a food processor or just crush ’em in a ziploc bag; “You don’t want to make them like sand.” Liat is throwing in her two cents (finally!) and offering “you want to make sure they’re kinda chunky.”
  4. Use a skewer to dip each strawberry in the melted chocolate
  5. Roll the strawberry tip (or as much as you want) in the crushed pistachios
  6. Lay out on parchment paper; put them in fridge to cool
  7. Serve same day
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Filed under desserts, Holidays

An Absolute Must!: Rachel & Louis’ Apple Cake

I wrote not long ago, that I was pining for the Puopolo’s Pesto recipe. Well….I got it. And let me just say – it was worth waiting for (and lived up to the hype!) I need to be born Italian in my next life. In any case, I am sworn to secrecy (Louis is serious about this) and in deference to Helen & Lou Puopolo who perfected the recipe over the years (they even snubbed the Pesto they had in Italy compared to their own), I accept my vow of silence.

Having said that – Rachel and Louis quite simply exceeded expectations yesterday. It is actually a recipe that they found in the NY Times – which reprinted this recipe from 1973. It’s been a while since I’ve seen a bundt pan (and in an Italian kitchen no less!). All I have to say – this cake is heavenly. Pure perfection. Moist and rich, yet light and velvety. Rachel and Louis added pecans to the mix – and I am going to follow it word for word. I was going to make some apple pie for the Holy American Thanksgiving, but I think Teddie’s – I mean Rachel and Louis’ – Apple cake just bumped it out.

To see the NY Times article (with a gorgeous picture of this cake) click here.
1973: Teddie’s Apple Cake

This recipe appeared in The Times in an article by Jean Hewitt.

Butter for greasing pan

3 cups flour, plus more for dusting pan

1 1/2 cups vegetable oil

2 cups sugar

3 eggs

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon vanilla

3 cups peeled, cored and thickly sliced tart apples, like Honeycrisp or Granny Smith

1 cup chopped walnuts

1 cup raisins

Vanilla ice cream (optional).

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour a 9-inch tube pan. Beat the oil and sugar together in a mixer (fitted with a paddle attachment) while assembling the remaining ingredients. After about 5 minutes, add the eggs and beat until the mixture is creamy.

2. Sift together 3 cups of flour, the salt, cinnamon and baking soda. Stir into the batter. Add the vanilla, apples, walnuts and raisins and stir until combined.

3. Transfer the mixture to the prepared pan. Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool in the pan before turning out. Serve at room temperature with vanilla ice cream, if desired.

Serves 8

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Baklawa: Something Sweet for the New Year

From the Great Epicurious.com:

“Balkava (from the Farsi for “many leaves”), a pastry perfected by royal bakers in the sultan’s palace in Istanbul, consists of layers of phyllo filled with nuts and spices and drenched in a syrup.

It has become a traditional Middle Eastern Rosh Hashannah and Purim treat but is enjoyed at celebrations throughout the year. There are numerous variations of baklava, many a closely guarded secret passed down within families. A walnut filling is more prevalent in the Levant, while pistachios and pistachio-almond fillings are preferred in Iran. Blanched almonds are traditional on Rosh Hashannah to produce a light color so that the year should be dulce y aclarada (“sweet and bright”).

Sephardim refrain from serving dark-colored pastries such as those made from walnuts on Rosh Hashannah, which would portend a dark year. Although purists disdain anything except the classic nut filling, some cooks innovated by adding such items as dates and chocolate chips. Hungarians make an apricot version. This very rich treat is usually served in small portions.

For more – click below:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/103991

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Filed under Iraqi, Israeli, Links, Middle-Eastern