Category Archives: Links

From Liat: Early Grey White Chocolate Chunk Muffins

 

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In an email sent last night at 12:59 AM, Liat Papular (above, center) reported on deliciousness on the web. The recipe below is from a great blog called “eat me, delicious” (now featuring chocolate souffle bars), a “vegetarian based exploration of food including lots of baked treats.”

These do indeed look delicious – check ’em out below.

 

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From eat me, delicious:
Earl Grey White Chocolate Chunk Muffins
Adapted from Baking From My Home To Yours

2/3 cup sugar
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon ground Earl Grey tea (or more if you dare)
3/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter, melted and cooled
3/4 cup white chocolate chunks

Directions:
  1. Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 400F. Butter or spray the 12 molds in a regular-size muffin pan or fit the molds with paper muffin cups.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar, flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and ground Earl Grey tea.
  3. In a large glass measuring cup or another bowl, whisk the sour cream, eggs, vanilla, and melted butter together until well blended.
  4. Pour the liquid ingredients over the dry ingredients and, with the whisk or a rubber spatula, gently but quickly stir to blend. Don’t worry about being thorough – a few lumps are better than over mixing the batter.
  5. Stir in the white chocolate chunks. Divide the batter evenly among the muffins cups.
  6. Bake for 18 to 20 minutes, or until the tops are golden and a thin knife inserted into the center of the muffins comes out clean.
  7. Transfer the pan to a rack and cool for 5 minutes before carefully removing each muffin from its mold.
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Filed under baking, Breakfast, desserts, Links

Muhammara: Red Pepper, Pomegranate Molasses and Walnut Dip

Okay – had dinner last night at hands-down the best Middle-Eastern restaurant I’ve been to since I moved to NYC. Nestled on Third Avenue in neighboring Bay Ridge, Tanoreen is a must.    

Owned by chef Rawia Bishara, who circulates the restaurant throughout the evening checking to make sure every table is happy and enjoying themselves, Tanoreen has been reviewed by the NY Times and listed in the “Best of NY” in New York Magazine on more than one occasion.  

Rawia Bishara

 One of the great dishes we had last night was Muhammara – a delicious blend of walnuts, pomegranate and red peppers. While we can’t get our hand’s on Rawia’s recipe for it – here is Paula Wolfert’s (from the great website: Leite’s Culinaria), the author of “The Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean.”

 

Paula Wolfert’s “The Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean”

 

Ingredients:

2 and half pounds of sweet bell red peppers

1 small hot chili pepper

1 and 1/2 cup of walnuts

1/2 cup wheat crackers

1 tbsp lemon juice

2 tbsp pomegranate molasses (If you search at the top of the page, I’ve included a recipe for this elsewhere on this site)

1/2 tsp. ground cumin

salt to taste

1/2 tsp sugar

2 tbsp olive oil

 

Click here for directions. 

 

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Filed under Appetizers, Israeli, Links, Middle-Eastern, sides

Asian Latkes with Soy Dipping Sauce

This is one I’ve never seen before: cabbage in latkes?!! But it actually sounds like it could be good – especially if you’re looking to switch it up a bit. 

This is a recipe from Rabbi Rachel Berenblat – you can find her blog here. Her recipe was featured in The Boston Globe, in 2006.

SAUCE

  • 1/2 cup soy sauce – LOW SODIUM
  • 1/2 cupe mirin (sweet rice wine)
  • 1 teaspoon Asian-style chili/garlic sauce
  • 1 piece (1 inch) fresh ginger, peeled & grated
  • 1 bunch scallions (white part only)  – chopped; reserve the green for the latkes

1. In a bowl, combine the soy sauce, mirin, chili sauce, ginger, and scallions.

2. Stir well and set aside.

LATKES

  • 1 large sweet potato – peeled
  • 5 small russet potatoes, peeled
  • 2 carrots
  •  1/4 green cabbage – cut into thin strips
  • 1/4 purple cabbage – cut into thin strips
  • 1 bunch of scallions – green part only
  • 8 eggs
  • 3 tbsp. sesame oil
  • 1 piece (4 inches) gingner – peeled & grated
  • 3 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup black sesame seeds
  • 10 ounces Matzo meal
  • Canola oil for frying

DIRECTIONS
In a food processor with the grating disk, grate the sweet and white potatoes, carrots, and onion. Transfer to a mixing bowl. Add the green and purple cabbages and scallions. Toss to mix.

2. In a separate mixing bowl, beat the eggs with 2 tablespoons of the sesame oil. Add the ginger.

3. Stir the egg mixture into the potato mixture. Add salt, sesame seeds, and matzo meal. Mix thoroughly. Use your hand to gauge the texture. A handful of the batter should just stick together but not be too dry. If it’s too dry, add more beaten egg; if it’s too thin, add a little more matzo meal.

4. In a large skillet, heat enough oil to make a 1/4-inch layer. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon sesame oil to the pan. Heat until the oil is hot.

5. With a spoon, pick up enough batter to make 2-inch pancakes and gently ease them into the hot oil. Do not crowd the pan. Fry about 4 minutes or until golden on the bottom. Turn and fry on the other side until golden. Drain on paper towels. Serve with dipping sauce. Adapted from Rachel Barenblat Notes:

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Farro and Roasted Butternut Squash

 Please check out a favorite blog of mine: 101 cookbooks.com. In a big rush today – but wishing all the Americans (and Canadians in America) a Happy Thanksgiving!

Farro and Roasted Butternut Squash

If you are pressed for time, opt for a lightly or semi-pearled farro (actually easier to find in some places), which will cut the cooking time for the grains down to about 20 minutes. Barley, both hulled and pearled, would make a nice substitution if you are having trouble finding farro. Also, I found the beautiful red spring onions at the farmers’ market but regular red onions will work well, and will be much easier to find.

2 cups farro, rinsed and drained
2 teaspoons fine-grain sea salt
5 cups water (or stock)
3 cups butternut squash, cut into 1/2-inch dice
1 large red onion cut into 1/8ths
1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 cup walnuts, deeply toasted
3 tablespoons toasted walnut oil (or more olive oil)
1/4 cup goat cheese, crumbled

Preheat oven to 375.

Combine the farro, salt, and water in a large, heavy saucepan over medium heat. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the farro is tender, 45 minutes to an hour, or about half the time if you are using semi-pearled farro. Taste often as it is cooking, you want it to be toothsome and retain structure. Remove from heat, drain any excess water, and set aside.

While the farro is cooking toss the squash, onion, and thyme with the olive oil, balsamic vinegar and a couple big pinches of salt on a rimmed baking sheet. Arrange in a single layer and place in the oven for about 20 minutes. Toss the squash and onions every 5-7 minutes to get browning on multiple sides. Remove from the oven, let cool a bit, and mince just 1/2 of the red onions.

In a large bowl gently toss the everything (except the goat cheese) with the toasted walnut oil (or olive oil). Taste and add a bit of salt if necessary. Serve family-style in a simple bowl or on a platter garnished with the goat cheese.

Serves 6 – 8 as a side, less as a main.

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Building Your Culinary Library: James Beard Foundation’s Top 20

Celebrating 20 years of the James Beard Foundation, the Book Awards committee has just released a Top 20 list for must-have cookbooks. There’s a range from Julia Child to Mark Bittman, from Chinese and Mexican to Italian.

This is a good list to keep on hand, when you’re looking to get some inspiration…. Here’s the top 10 (they’re listed alphabetically – not by any other hierarchy). To see the rest of the list, click below:

The James Beard Book Awards Committee’s 20 Essential Books to Build Your Culinary Library:

  1. American Cookery (BBS Publishing Corporation, 1996), James Beard

 

 2. Authentic Mexican: Regional Cooking from the Heart of Mexico (William Morrow Cookbooks, 2007), Rick Bayless

 

3. Better Homes and Gardens New Cookbook (Better Homes and Gardens, 2004)

 

 

4. Classic Indian Cooking (William Morrow Cookbooks, 1980),Julie Sahni

 

5. Complete Techniques (Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, 2001), Jacques Pépinand Léon Pererr

 

6. Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking (Macmillan, 1995), Marcella Hazan

 

 

7. How to Cook Everything: Simple Recipes for Great Food (Wiley, 2006), Mark Bittman

 

8. The Joy of Cooking (Scribner, 2006), Irma S. Rombauer and Marion Rombauer Becker

 

9. The King Arthur Flour Baker’s Companion: The All-Purpose Baking Cookbook (Countryman Press, 2003)

 

 

 

10. Maida Heatter’s Book of Great Desserts (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 1999), Maida Heatter


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An Absolute Must!: Rachel & Louis’ Apple Cake

I wrote not long ago, that I was pining for the Puopolo’s Pesto recipe. Well….I got it. And let me just say – it was worth waiting for (and lived up to the hype!) I need to be born Italian in my next life. In any case, I am sworn to secrecy (Louis is serious about this) and in deference to Helen & Lou Puopolo who perfected the recipe over the years (they even snubbed the Pesto they had in Italy compared to their own), I accept my vow of silence.

Having said that – Rachel and Louis quite simply exceeded expectations yesterday. It is actually a recipe that they found in the NY Times – which reprinted this recipe from 1973. It’s been a while since I’ve seen a bundt pan (and in an Italian kitchen no less!). All I have to say – this cake is heavenly. Pure perfection. Moist and rich, yet light and velvety. Rachel and Louis added pecans to the mix – and I am going to follow it word for word. I was going to make some apple pie for the Holy American Thanksgiving, but I think Teddie’s – I mean Rachel and Louis’ – Apple cake just bumped it out.

To see the NY Times article (with a gorgeous picture of this cake) click here.
1973: Teddie’s Apple Cake

This recipe appeared in The Times in an article by Jean Hewitt.

Butter for greasing pan

3 cups flour, plus more for dusting pan

1 1/2 cups vegetable oil

2 cups sugar

3 eggs

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon vanilla

3 cups peeled, cored and thickly sliced tart apples, like Honeycrisp or Granny Smith

1 cup chopped walnuts

1 cup raisins

Vanilla ice cream (optional).

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour a 9-inch tube pan. Beat the oil and sugar together in a mixer (fitted with a paddle attachment) while assembling the remaining ingredients. After about 5 minutes, add the eggs and beat until the mixture is creamy.

2. Sift together 3 cups of flour, the salt, cinnamon and baking soda. Stir into the batter. Add the vanilla, apples, walnuts and raisins and stir until combined.

3. Transfer the mixture to the prepared pan. Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool in the pan before turning out. Serve at room temperature with vanilla ice cream, if desired.

Serves 8

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Fancy Bourekas: Phyllo Triangles with Basil, Zucchini & Pine Nuts

This recipe is for when you have a little bit of time on your hands – and I promise, it’s worth every second. If you haven’t worked with phyllo dough before, remember that patience is a virtue. I used olive oil instead of butter – and much less than the recipe called for. A pastry brush is helpful to have on hand, and garnishing the ‘bourekas’ with sesame seeds is a nice touch. You can use the oil to glaze the bourekas, or a beaten egg will do nicely as well. These are great for a dinner party – and truly impress. I brought them to a tapas party last year and they went quickly.

I got the recipe from Epicurious.com. Click here to see it on the site.

Ingredients

12 ounces zucchini, trimmed, coarsely grated
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons olive oil
3/4 chopped onion
6 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1/4 cup dry white wine
1/3 cup crumbled feta cheese
1/3 cup packed grated Parmesan cheese
6 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted
1 egg
6 sheets fresh phyllo pastry or frozen, thawed
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted
1 egg white, beaten to blend (glaze)
Sesame seeds

Preparation

Toss zucchini with 1/2 teaspoon salt in medium bowl. Let stand 30 minutes. Drain zucchini well; roll in kitchen towel and squeeze dry. Heat oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion; sauté until beginning to brown, about 6 minutes. Add zucchini; sauté until beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Mix in basil, parsley and garlic; add wine. Cover skillet; simmer 3 minutes. Uncover; stir until any liquid evaporates, about 2 minutes. Transfer zucchini mixture to large bowl and cool. Mix in both cheeses, then pine nuts. Season filling with salt and pepper. Mix in egg.

Lightly oil 2 large baking sheets. Place 1 phyllo sheet on work surface with 1 short end parallel to edge of work surface (keep remaining phyllo covered with plastic wrap and damp kitchen towel.) Brush phyllo sheet lightly with butter; cut lengthwise into 3 equal strips, each about 4 inches wide. Place 1 generous tablespoon filling at bottom end of 1 strip. Fold 1 corner of phyllo over filling. Repeat folding down length of strip as for flag, brushing twice with butter and forming triangle. Place pastry on prepared baking sheet; brush with butter. Repeat with remaining phyllo sheets and filling. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover tightly with plastic and chill.)

Preheat oven to 400°F. Brush pastries with egg white. Sprinkle pastries generously with sesame seeds. Bake until golden brown, about 25 minutes.

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Filed under Appetizers, Links, Middle-Eastern, sides, Veggies